Category Archives: Pork

Karl’s Sausage and Spinach Alfredo

Eilene’s friends are coming over for dinner after a long hike. Wife Jan is still at Burning Man and while she would find this dish “too rich” the kids will like it. While I could have made my own Alfredo sauce I decided to try a short cut. I like to make the dishes that I make for Eilene’s friends one dish meals—protein, starch, and vegetables all in one recipe.

Karl’s Sausage and Spinach Alfredo

Karl’s Sausage and Spinach Alfredo

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Karl’s  Hawaiian Lau Lau Pork

Last week, we were at a local restaurant that served lau lau pork (leaf leaf pork). Miriam bought a side dish of this and it was amazing. In reading about it, it appears that it is usually made with both fish and pork, but the restaurant and many of the recipes I found on-line replace the salted fish with soy sauce.

Karl’s Hawaiian Lau Lau Pork

Karl’s Hawaiian Lau Lau Pork

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Karl’s Homemade Pasta Sauce

Last week Jan’s farmer friend dropped pounds of tomatoes on us. To preserve them, I turned them into three quarts of a simple tomato sauce—just tomatoes and a bit of salt. This allowed me the greatest flexibility when I decided what to use the sauce in a recipe— meaning it did not lock me into Italian cuisine, like so many of the sauces on-line.

Karl’s Homemade Pasta Sauce

Karl’s Homemade Pasta Sauce

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Karl’s Creole Gumbo II

Eilene is having friends over, so I needed something to feed hungry 20-somethings. I have made versions of both this dish and jambalaya before, but I wanted one that was simple enough for a weekday meal. The basic difference between a gumbo and jambalaya is whether you pour the sauce over the rice or cook the rice in the sauce.

Karl’s Creole Gumbo II

Karl’s Creole Gumbo II

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Filed under Main Dishes, Pork, Poultry, Shrimp

Karl’s Carnitas Enchiladas with Avocado

Wandering through Trader Joe’s, wondering what I was going to make for dinner—this is actually not an uncommon occurrence. I saw a package of pre-cooked pork carnitas. I could do a quick pork taco with that, but I make tacos almost every week. Walking down another aisle, I saw Trader Joe’s enchilada sauce, and it clicked—pork enchiladas!

Karl’s Carnitas Enchiladas with Avocado

Karl’s Carnitas Enchiladas with Avocado

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Filed under Beans, Main Dishes, Pork, Sauces and Spices

Karl’s New York Style Za’atar Ricotta Pizza with Apple and Prosciutto

Nephew Braden is coming to Sunday dinner. When Miriam told him about my New York Style pizzas he expressed interest. I learned to make New York style pizza crusts a few weeks ago. Each batch makes enough dough for 2-3 pizzas. To keep things interesting, I usually make each one differently.

Karl’s New York Style Za’atar Ricotta Pizza with Apple and Prosciutto

Karl’s New York Style Za’atar Ricotta Pizza
with Apple and Prosciutto

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Karl’s Hawaiian Pizza with a Semolina Crust

As I was growing up, my mother made pizza on many Sunday nights. As I have struggled to come up with new recipes to post to my blog, I have found other ways of doing things. This week, I decided to try using semolina in the crust.

Karl’s Hawaiian Pizza with a Semolina Crust (thick crust)

Karl’s Hawaiian Pizza with a Semolina Crust
thick crust

While I had heard of using semolina for a pizza crust, I had little idea of what exactly it was. Semolina is coarsely ground durum wheat that contains more middlings—the parts of the grain of wheat that are not flour—than white flour. As a result, semolina has more proteins, vitamins, lipids and minerals than regular flour. Semolina also has more gluten, a yellow color, and a distinct flavor.

Having never used this flour before I looked at a recipe in order to find somewhere to start. This recipe used a fifty/fifty blend of flours and a warm water dough. The resulting crust was a tender and did not raise very much.

The crust recipe I was using used warm water in the dough mix. Warm water causes the strands of gluten to link up only with the other strands near them. However, most of the gluten bonds link in on themselves. This makes for a very tender dough that is easy to roll out.

In response to complaints, I tried this recipe again a few days later. Instead of dividing the dough in half, I made four thin pizzas—trying to get a crisper crust. While all of these pizzas were tasty, my family was still not happy with the soft crusts.

Note: I will be posting another attempt later using a very different and more successful recipe.

Wife Jan’s favorite pizza is Hawaiian—with pineapple and Canadian bacon. I decided that instead of just tossing cold bits of fruit onto the pizza I would grill slices of the pineapple first. This turned out to be a very popular idea.

Karl’s Hawaiian Pizza with a Semolina Crust

Ingredients

Crust

1 cup bread flour
1 cup semolina flour
1 tsp. granulated sugar
½ tsp. Kosher  salt

2 tsp. active dry yeast
¾ cup very warm water
3 Tbs. olive oil

Semolina for sprinkling on the pizza stone

Pizza Sauce

1 Tbs. olive oil
2 cloves garlic
1 Tbs. tomato paste
1 can tomato sauce
2 tsp. oregano

Toppings

1 lb. part skim mozzarella, grated
½ lb Canadian bacon
6 slices fresh pineapple, grilled

Directions

1. Put the flours, sugar, and salt into a large bowl and whisk—or sift—the ingredients together.

2. Put the yeast in a small cup and add ¼ cup of warm water.

Tip: If the water is too hot it will kill the yeast.

Note: The original recipe used “instant” yeast mixed directly into the flour mixture. I prefer to use active dry yeast and “proofing” it before adding it with the liquid ingredients. I think it give the yeast a better “jump start.”

3. Make a well in the dry ingredients and add the yeast, warm water, and two tablespoons of the olive oil.

Tip: Again you do not want the water to be too hot.

4. Mix until most of the dry flour has been absorbed and turn it out on a lightly floured board.

5. Knead the dough briefly until you have a smooth dough, 2-3 minutes.

Note: The hot water will have already bound most of the gluten bonds, so that the long kneading will not cause the strong gluten networks of some raised breads.  You are just trying to make sure that all of the dry flour is fully incorporated.

6. Form the dough into a ball and add the remaining tablespoon of olive oil into the bowl.

7. Put the dough ball into the bowl and coat it with the oil.

8. Cover the bowl with a damp cloth and place it in a warm spot.

9. Let the dough rise until doubled in size, 1-2 hours.

10. While the dough is rising make the pizza sauce.

11. Put the olive oil in a medium sauté pan, over a medium heat, and add the garlic.

12. Sauté the garlic until fragrant, about one minute.

13. Add the tomato paste to the pan and sauté until the paste has darkened, about another minute.

14. Stir in the tomato sauce, oregano, and basil.

Tip: Scrape the tomato fond from the bottom of the pan to prevent scorching.

15. Simmer the sauce for 10-20 minutes, until the flavors have melded and the sauce has thickened.

Tip: Stir occasionally so that the tomato sauce does not stick to the bottom of the pan and scorch.

16. Remove the pan from the heat and let the sauce cool.

17. Grate the cheese and cut the ham and pineapple into medium small pieces.

18. Put a baking stone on the middle rack of the oven and preheat it while you are assembling your pizzas.

Tip: If you do not have a baking stone, you may use a cookie sheet.

18. Divide the dough into 2-4 equal parts and form them into balls.

Tip: I push the cut edge into the middle of the ball and pull the smooth sides around to the joint together at the bottom. This prevents the yeast gasses inside the dough—that causes it to rise—from escaping.

Note: I made this recipe twice in one week. The first time I divided the dough in half to make a thicker crust—see the picture above. My family wanted a crisper crust, so I divided the next recipe into four pieces, but still rolled the dough out to the same size making a very thin crust.

19. Taking one ball at a time, roll them out into a 10-12 inch disk on a lightly floured board.

20. Transfer the pizza to a peel that has been well dusted with cornmeal or semolina.

Tip: The course flour keeps the dough from sticking to the peel as you are sliding it into the oven.

Note: I use cookie sheets as peels. I use the modern, thick ones to slide the pizzas onto the baking stone, but I have an old, thin, steel cooking sheet to remove them from the oven.

21. Spread some of the pizza sauce over the dough and scatter some of the cheese, ham, and pineapple evenly over the sauce.

Tip: Let the pizza rise for 10-15 minutes, while you start preparing the next dough ball.

22. Bake the pizza for 12-14 minutes, rotating the pie halfway through the baking time.

Tip: Until the cheese has started to be spotty browned and the crust is lightly browned on the bottom.

Note: Lift up one edge to check the bottom of the crust.

23. Transfer the pizza to a wire rack to cool, for 5-10 minutes.

Tip: The cheese is hot and will burn your mouth, if you eat it too soon.

24. Continue until all of your pizzas are baked.

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Karl’s Easter Grilled Ham Steak with Cranberry Orange Marmalade

When I proposed my usual Greek lamb for this Easter’s dinner, I was faced with a bit of a revolt. We finally settled on both ham and salmon as the main dishes. For everyday meals, I usually broil my ham steaks, but—since I was already planning to plank grill the salmon—grilling it this time was an easy decision.

Karl’s Easter Grilled Ham Steak With Cranberry Orange Marmalade

Karl’s Easter Grilled Ham Steak
with Cranberry Orange Marmalade

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Karl’s Dàn Dàn Miàn II (Sichuan Peddler’s Noodles)

I have made this dish before, but son-in-law Chris asked for this hot and sour dish as his birthday meal. Last time, I made this fairly close to the traditional recipe. This time, I decided to add more meat and use some tricks I have picked up to boost the flavor.

Karl’s Dàn Dàn Miàn II (Sichuan Peddler’s Noodles)

Karl’s Dàn Dàn Miàn II
Sichuan Peddler’s Noodles

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Karl’s Quick Beef and Pork Chili

My sister, Karen, came through town last week and for one of the meals I made chili. As I had not planned  to make a third meal for her it was a bit of a spur of the moment thing. While everyone else went for a hike, I whipped up a quick chili.

Karl’s Quick Beef and Pork Chili

Karl’s Quick Beef and Pork Chili

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Filed under Beef, California Fusion, Main Dishes, Pork, Stews